Re: [uCsimm] cs8900 & wait-states

From: Robert Poor (r@media.mit.edu)
Date: Tue Dec 12 2000 - 15:17:00 EST


Florian:

You'll probably get way too many replies for this one, and I'm
probably not the first.

Here's a question: if you're transmitting a multiple-byte
value over a network, which would you send first? The MSByte
or the LSByte? There are good arguments for either order.

Your argument for big-endian ordering is compelling: you can read
bytes the way they appear in memory.

But mightn't it make sense that the least significant byte of a
multi-byte word appear in the least significant address? That's
the little-endian argument.

Both viewpoints are valid. They're just different.

- Rob

"Florian G. Pflug" wrote:
>
> On Thu, Dec 07, 2000 at 02:10:09PM +0100, sticke_m wrote:
> > There is no reason than just historical of putting the low
> > or the high byte of a word at first in memory.
> > For motorola you can write $12345678 in memory for a $12345678
> > and for intel you write $78563412. It's just a historical reason.
> Hi
>
> Just for interesset...
>
> Does anyone know if it ever had any advantage to do it one or the other way
> round?
>
> The big-endian format seems much more logical to me (after all, $12345678 is
> $12345678 in memory with this).
>
> So there had to be some reason, why someone ever hat the idea to swap the
> bytes and store it as $87654321....
>
> Or, maybe this was just some mistake in an early chip/board layout? ;-))))
> Just like once, long long time ago people actually had an "unmount" command
> - until someone forgot the "n" in an BSD-Release...
>
> greetings, Florian Pflug
> This message resent by the ucsimm@uclinux.com list server http://www.uClinux.com/
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